Google opens its first UK centre making tech for disabled people

If you design technology with disabled people in mind, you design technology better for everyone. This was the sentiment from Google as it opened its first UK research and development centre dedicated to making tech to help people with disabilities.

The Royal National Institute of Blind People, the Royal National Institute for Deaf People and disability charity Everyone Can have worked with Google on developing the centre in London. It is the company’s first accessibility-focused site outside the US. BBC technology reporter Paul Carter said the tech being developed by Google had the “potential to be significant” for disabled people.

There’s a saying in the disability community – ‘nothing about us without us’ – and it’s great to see one of the major tech players embracing that ethos and creating a space to design products and services in a way that they can work with, and not just for, disabled people.”

Google has lots of research teams working on things like artificial intelligence, and a number of the engineers are tasked with looking at “supercharging” accessible tech, making it more mainstream. For example, subtitling technology, which originally started out to help deaf and hard-of-hearing television viewers, had a positive impact on people in general, and has become useful for the masses.

Christopher Patnoe, from Google’s inclusion team, said: “When people have equitable access to information and opportunity, everyone wins – but we know people’s needs are constantly changing, throughout their lives or even their day. “We know we have more to do,” he said.

Project Relate is a Google app, launching in beta in the UK, which helps people who have conditions that makes their speech difficult to interpret. The app learns how to better recognise speech patterns of those who might struggle – like people with muscular dystrophy – and helps them communicate more easily. It does this by transcribing speech to text in real time, repeating someone’s voice in a synthesised voice and speaking into voice assistants.

https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-63828617

Published by charlesghose

Charles Ghose graduated the University Of Greenwich London with a BA in Communications and Media. His university life was very enriched by his very active participation in various University societies. Charles ran the gamut of campus student communities; he was involved with the Politics and Debate Societies, Students Union, and University Of Greenwich Choir, and chamber choir. Charles Ghose acts as an independent contractor working in the very lucrative Freelance Translator Field. He has been hired by various International Humanitarian NGO's, private corporations, and The Overseas Fellowship Mission. Charles has also lead workshops for employers on the theme of mindfulness training courses for the improvement of employee’s health and well-being. Charles is a strong believer that a happy work force adds to higher productivity and loyalty to a company by employees.

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